ECRI Blog

Three Costly Pitfalls of Purchased Services Contracts

Purchased services are seen as the next great savings frontier in healthcare—and with good reason. Spend on purchased services accounts for approximately 30 to 35 percent of a hospital’s non-labor expenditures. Tapping into even a small portion of that spend can lead to significant financial savings. However, purchased services contracts are complex and the legal language can be difficult to understand. What seems like a competitively low price may actually result in unexpected charges and poor performance outcomes.

Over the past few years, I’ve worked with many hospitals and health systems on purchased services contracts and have seen my share of “the good, the bad, and the ugly.” What are some of the recurring themes? Some vendors bury language that is advantageous to their business. They omit key information and make performance management difficult for the hospital. While every purchased services contract is unique and every circumstance is different, it is possible to mitigate common traps and omissions that can lead to unexpected costs, poor performance, and no remedy when things go south.

Looking for service contract pitfalls to avoid? Check out my top three purchased services contract problem areas to gain the insight you need to improve the quality of services and drive savings across your organization.

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Topics: Supply Chain

4 Ways to Prevent Harm from Surgical Staplers

If you’ve been following medical device safety issues this year, there’s a good chance you’ve seen the headlines about patient injuries and deaths related to internal surgical staplers. The devices are commonly used in many high-risk surgical procedures. Misuse and malfunction of surgical staplers can lead to serious complications—as we’ve seen during our own research and accident investigations.

The stapler cases we investigate tend to be associated with serious injuries or fatalities, some of which could have been prevented. The overall adverse event rate is low relative to the number of times staplers are used; however, cases of preventable death are chilling. This has led ECRI Institute to thoroughly research and evaluate staplers and to publish safety hazards to our members. In fact, surgical staplers have appeared twice on our annual list of Top 10 Health Technology Hazards— first in 2010 and again in 2017.

So, why is this decades-old technology in the news now? And, more importantly, what can you do to keep patients safe?

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Topics: Health Devices, Patient Safety, Accident Investigation

Avoiding the Blame Game in Preventing Medical Errors

In late 2017, a catastrophic medication error led to a patient death at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. While waiting for a PET scan, an elderly woman was incorrectly administered vecuronium, a paralyzing neuromuscular blocker, rather than the prescribed sedative Versed. It was reported that, because vecuronium suppresses normal respiration and the patient was left unattended while waiting for the test, she suffered cardiopulmonary arrest. Although she was resuscitated, it was too late to prevent brain death, and she was later removed from life support.

This case was widely reported in the media as an example of preventable medical errors that injure or kill too many patients, despite our efforts to make healthcare safer. As we reach the 20-year anniversary of To Err Is Human, the landmark Institute of Medicine report that crystalized the patient safety movement in the U.S., we must humble ourselves with the knowledge that while we’ve made many improvements, there is still much more work to do.

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Topics: Patient Safety

The Monopoly Board of Clinical Guidelines

When the closure of the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) hit the news, the ECRI team who worked on the contract felt as though we had lost a dear friend. After all, we had a 20-year history with NGC. That’s a long relationship by any measure. Yet, we had little time to mourn because we had an organizational commitment to disseminate evidence-based guidelines into practice.

ECRI’s decision to create its own guideline repository was welcome news to many members of the guideline community. However, it left some people wondering how our new repository would compare to NGC. I’m here to tell you that the ECRI Guidelines Trust™ is not a reboot of NGC. NGC was a groundbreaking initiative, and it should hold its own place in guideline history.

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Topics: Guidelines Trust

Your Smart Phone Will See You Now

The science of forecasting medical technology is lousy. We hear so many pundits predicting the next revolutionary medical technology advancement that it is literally impossible to keep track of them all.  It is not news that many of these predictions never come to pass. Nonetheless, amazing technology advances do occur and change medicine forever.

Just look back 80 years when hospital wards housed dozens of monstrous-looking devices called iron lungs. These life-saving devices treated people who were unable to breathe because of paralyzed chest muscles. Today, we don’t see hospitals with huge wards filled with iron lungs anymore. Who made that technology disappear? Certainly not the iron lung manufacturers. It wasn’t even a hardware technology innovation that changed patient care. It was a biologic—the polio vaccine—that changed the future of the hospital from treating dozens of polio cases to almost none. Who could have seen that coming?

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Topics: Industry Trends

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Our evidence supports the advancement of care around the world. Read our articles, get industry updates and trends, and learn a little more about us on the ECRI Institute blog.

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